The CNCPTS and Adidas Store in Boston is a Temple of Sneakers

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The Sanctuary in Boston, designed by Montreal creative agency Sid Lee, is a near-religious experience for sneakerheads.

As partners, and Adidas go way back. Not as far back as Run D.M.C.’s hip hop hit  (released in 1986). Rather, since partnering in 2008, Sid Lee has  for Adidas, and  that featured such stars as Derrick Rose and Katy Perry. The Montreal creative agency has certainly learned how to sell shell-toed shoes and tri-stripes.

Sid Lee’s latest work with the German footwear giant, which it executed in tandem with , is now open in Boston. It’s an Adidas collaboration with streetwear boutique CNCPTS – and it’s a retail space that’s more like a temple.

The CNCPTS and Adidas store in Boston was developed by Sid Lee.

Called The Sanctuary, Sid Lee’s senior VP Elana Gorbatyuk says the boutique’s retail experience is meant to evoke sense of religious awe. Its 1,200-square-foot location on Newbury Street caters to high-end sneaker obsessives that also appreciate CNCPTS’s coveted streetwear. “We wanted the store to be special, especially for fans of limited editions who have seen it all.”

The CNCPTS and Adidas store in Boston was developed by Sid Lee.

The arched entrance features glass doors bearing a pattern that interlocks both brands. To our eyes, it resembles a confessional booth screen.

The CNCPTS and Adidas store in Boston was developed by Sid Lee.

Once inside, customers enter what Sid Lee calls the “liberation tunnel chamber,” where, surrounded by raw brick and concrete, the sneakers are elevated on mirrored podiums.

The CNCPTS and Adidas store in Boston was developed by Sid Lee.

As shoppers advance through the main corridor, modular thresholds reveal themselves to invoke a sense of discovery. Shoes, T-shirts and other merchandise becomes more visible as one venture further into the store.

The CNCPTS and Adidas store in Boston was developed by Sid Lee.

The interior features subtle metal fasteners for mounting sneakers on the walls, and screens fill brick archways, adding a contemporary touch to the building’s original bones. Instead of the usual vitrines, shoes on display at the centre of the space are presented on glass and mirror sculptures by Toronto-Santiago artist . The artful podiums allow for the sneakers to be viewed from various angles.

Jordan Söderberg Mills developed this glass sculpture for the CNCPTS and Adidas store in Boston.

The journey ends with the fitting rooms. Floor-to-ceiling mirrors contrast exposed brick walls, and coloured fluorescent lighting gives them a nocturnal, dream-like quality. It’s a setting that feels less like a church, more like  – and that’s not a bad thing.

 

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