The Scotch-Tape Tunnel of Paris

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It took 12 people 10 days to wrap the concrete pillars within the museum's grand entrance with the tunnel, which stretches for 50 metres, and is positioned six metres above the ground.
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Inside the Palais de Tokyo, a suspended tunnel made entirely of Scotch tape – designed by the Berlin collective Numen / For Use – stretches and twists its way through the entrance level.

We mostly use transparent tape to secure wrapping paper or to stick a sheet of paper to the wall. Yet some of the strongest household adhesives can withstand more than 30 kilograms of force before breaking. At, the  collective has created one of the most visually provocative exploits of the humble material with a floating landscape that stretches from one end of the art centre’s grand entrance to the other. The installation, Tape Paris, uses 43.3 kilometres of tape and is strong enough to allow up to four visitors to traverse its inner web at once.

This isn’t the first time Numen / For Use has displayed the enormous potential of tape architecture, having envisioned similar installations in Tokyo and Melbourne in recent years. They have also assembled climbable environments out of ordinary string and constructed vertical mazes using flexible netting.

For Tape Paris, it took 12 people 10 days to wrap the structure around the concrete pillars, and wind it across 50 metres of space, six metres above the floor. In place until January 2015, the installation is part of a larger exhibition entitled Inside, where 30 international artists works explore the metaphoric, psychological and physical realm of interiority.

Tape Paris is on view at Palais de Tokyo in Paris until January 11, 2015.

 

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