A Planet for Tomorrow 2018

Category

Submission Deadline

 
Graphics May 10, 2018

Please note that this competition has expired and is for reference only. See our active listings for competitions.

This year our ‘Day for Tomorrow’ is September 16th, the International Day for the Preservation of the Ozone Layer. This event celebrates the agreement of the groundbreaking Montreal Protocol on this date in 1987.

When scientists in the 1970s found that chemicals used in common household products were contributing to the depletion of the ozone layer, the world acted to prevent further damage. Every country from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe signed a treaty to ban the production of ozone-depleting chemicals. Thanks to this treaty (The Montreal Protocol) being signed, the ozone layer is expected to return to normal levels by 2050.

As much as a solution to the hole in the ozone layer, what the Montreal Protocol offers us is hope: we came together as a planet once to successfully combat global warming – can we do it again to prevent further damage now that 97% of scientists agree that climate change is a reality?

We must. We are already experiencing the impact of changing weather patterns, rising sea levels and extreme weather events. According to NASA, 2016 was the hottest year on record. The second hottest? 2017. The third? 2015. And what’s driving climate change? The greenhouse gas emissions produced by human activity, which are at their highest levels since human history. Yet we are doing nothing to stop this. A report by the Global Carbon Project presented at the 2017 United Nations Climate Summit predicted that emissions from fossil fuels and industrial uses were projected to increase by 2% in 2017 and rise further in 2018. Last year carbon dioxide exceeded 410 parts per million, the highest levels in millions of years.

Global warming can be tackled on two levels: institutional and individual. Therefore this year we have not one, but two briefs. You can make posters for both briefs, but no more than three posters in total.